An important destinations distinction

In October 2018 the DfE published “Destinations Data: Good Practice guide for schools” which, as DfE guidance documents go, is a snappy publication that sets out how schools and Colleges should approach collecting destination information from their learners, the duties beholden on Local Authorities in this area, where this information is then published and how it can be used to adapt provision.

The important section that I wanted to highlight for this post was the definition of “Destinations data” vs “Destinations Measures” which I had never considered before and will now endeavour to adhere to use as a definition in future posts and discussions about destinations and would hope that other practitioners join me in sticking to.

  • What is Destinations data?

destinations1

  • What are Destinations Measures?

destinations2

This is important because, as the Gatsby benchmarks and the Careers Strategy gain momentum and Ofsted continue to inspect CEIAG provision in schools, positive destination data will become more of badge of honour to schools keen to show they are taking Careers work seriously. Differences could then arise between what a school claims is their Destination data and what is published by the DfE and then included in their performance tables as the school data may rely on leavers future intended destinations while the DfE data looks back at sustained destinations.

In fact this has already happened with UTCs who have long claimed extremely positive destination data has a significant benefit to their model of education only to recently have their claims undermined by the more robust and historically confirmed DfE Destination Measures. As the DfE Measures record

the number of students who have been in a sustained destination for six months in the year after finishing key stage 4 or 16- 18 study (from October to March, or any six consecutive months for apprenticeships). The headline accountability measure at both key stage 4 and 16-18 study is the proportion of students staying in education or employment for at least two terms

they will be a much better reflection of the actual destinations of learners.

It is important that schools do not solely use their own data to evaluate their CEIAG provision and are using Destination Measures as well as comparison between the two may also highlight useful factors (for example, if many learners where intending to secure apprenticeships but then did not or if learners from disadvantaged backgrounds were struggling to progress). It is also vital that Ofsted inspectors brief themselves on the historical trends in a school’s Destination Measures before an inspection which may show the steady progress in leavers securing more apprenticeships or other positive and sustained destinations which would reflect well on the school’s Careers work.

So, from this point on – Destinations data = a school’s intended or checked leaver destination figures. Destination Measures = the DfE published figures.

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