Face 2 Face IAG

An important destinations distinction

In October 2018 the DfE published “Destinations Data: Good Practice guide for schools” which, as DfE guidance documents go, is a snappy publication that sets out how schools and Colleges should approach collecting destination information from their learners, the duties beholden on Local Authorities in this area, where this information is then published and how it can be used to adapt provision.

The important section that I wanted to highlight for this post was the definition of “Destinations data” vs “Destinations Measures” which I had never considered before and will now endeavour to adhere to use as a definition in future posts and discussions about destinations and would hope that other practitioners join me in sticking to.

  • What is Destinations data?

destinations1

  • What are Destinations Measures?

destinations2

This is important because, as the Gatsby benchmarks and the Careers Strategy gain momentum and Ofsted continue to inspect CEIAG provision in schools, positive destination data will become more of badge of honour to schools keen to show they are taking Careers work seriously. Differences could then arise between what a school claims is their Destination data and what is published by the DfE and then included in their performance tables as the school data may rely on leavers future intended destinations while the DfE data looks back at sustained destinations.

In fact this has already happened with UTCs who have long claimed extremely positive destination data has a significant benefit to their model of education only to recently have their claims undermined by the more robust and historically confirmed DfE Destination Measures. As the DfE Measures record

the number of students who have been in a sustained destination for six months in the year after finishing key stage 4 or 16- 18 study (from October to March, or any six consecutive months for apprenticeships). The headline accountability measure at both key stage 4 and 16-18 study is the proportion of students staying in education or employment for at least two terms

they will be a much better reflection of the actual destinations of learners.

It is important that schools do not solely use their own data to evaluate their CEIAG provision and are using Destination Measures as well as comparison between the two may also highlight useful factors (for example, if many learners where intending to secure apprenticeships but then did not or if learners from disadvantaged backgrounds were struggling to progress). It is also vital that Ofsted inspectors brief themselves on the historical trends in a school’s Destination Measures before an inspection which may show the steady progress in leavers securing more apprenticeships or other positive and sustained destinations which would reflect well on the school’s Careers work.

So, from this point on – Destinations data = a school’s intended or checked leaver destination figures. Destination Measures = the DfE published figures.

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Going for a job interview in the States around Halloween has it’s own special challenges

“An actual interview going on at the office. We take Halloween very seriously.”

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Some of the comments:

I too had an interview on halloween last year. Yes, the interviewers, all four, were wearing costumes ranging from sorceress to tin man.

I interviewed 3 years ago at a company during their halloween dress up day. The people interviewing me were dressed up as Forrest Gump and Lt Dan.

I’m honestly not certain what the Careers profession can do to prepare clients for this!

via r/funny

Finding yourself

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From Reddit Get Motivated

It’s an appealing piece of writing and will ring true for many if they reflect on their career journey but I’m not sure if I completely agree with it with regard to careers theory.

It certainly contains elements of agreement with the growth and exploration phases of Super’s five life and career development stages but seems to start from a position that the individual is returning to a fixed, preordained destination that was always within them. It is a position that retreats from (the rightly much criticised) Dweck’s Mindset work.

The idea is positioned closely to Gottfredson’s Circumscription and Compromise theory which includes the self-reflection and actualization of the quote but Gottfredson also promotes the need for the individual to expose themselves to a wider range of experiences to aid the reflection process.

The idea in the image is closer to Parson’s “trait and match” basis of the client as an unmovable object who, before navigating the labour market along their favoured journey and perhaps even to find a satisfying destination, takes the time to undergo a process of deeper self realisation to understanding their aptitudes and interests. How experience has shaped these traits is not discussed, only that they are present and can be tested. This theory has its critiques in respect to it’s assumption on the stability of the labour market and the stability of the traits of the client. The quote in the image proposes the later and discounts the influence of experience gained along the journey being stripped away and, for that reason, it loses value for me.

 

 

 

 

 

Using images & visual starters in Career Guidance

With a h/t to @CareersResearch I found these examples from Katherine Jennick about her practice using visual starters and images in her 1:1 IAG work with her cohort of Key Stage 3 & 4 clients very interesting.

The discussion with Liane Hambly (from around 17 minutes in the video below) is an excellent CPD resource and, I would imagine, a very useful resource for any leaders of the Level 6 Career Guidance and Development Diploma. Give it a watch.

 

 

In 2018/2019, UCAS will charging schools & colleges for a poorer service

One of the regular annual financial outgoings from a school or College’s CEIAG budget are the various fees to access the different services and registrations for the UCAS advisers website. For education institutions there is no choice but UCAS to administer their learner’s Higher Education applications and this is reflected in the zero charge to become a registered UCAS centre. Where the charges from UCAS do start to rack up though is the extra services on offer to track the progress of offers, replies and acceptances your learners make. These are useful tools for tracking the destinations of learners, the offers they received and how your institution compares to competitors but they come with an individual or packaged price tag.

ucas adviser track fees

Paying for a service is that helps write destination reports and offer a better service to learners is perfectly reasonable. What will cause consternation to those paying for those services from the 2019 application cycle will be the fact that the data they rely upon may be incomplete.

Advisers signing into the 2019 portal will be greeted with this:

ucas 2019 sign in

Which, as I asked UCAS,

means that, from now on, any reports offered by UCAS may be based on incomplete data as learners may not have opted in to share their post application progress with their centre.

Of course GDPR is an important piece of legislation that has fundamentally reframed the way that individuals regard the use of their data both on and off the internet and UCAS Corporate cannot ignore it. What is seems they are willing to ignore though is that they will be charging educational institutions a fee for what will be, in effect, a poorer service and product. They are also oblivious to the potential knock on customer service effect this will have on learners as many will be approaching the source of IAG in their school or College post application only for the Adviser to have no method of checking their application unless the applicant signs in to UCAS Apply/Track themselves. I can see this significantly increasing the number of calls to UCAS support lines as school based IAG advisers find themselves unable to offer much post application IAG as they will not be able to see the learner’s application.

Schools & Colleges should be aware of this change and will have to do their best to encourage their learners to opt in to sharing their post application progress but this will only go so far. Many learners complete their form in their own time, away from school or College, so will go through the terms & conditions section without an Adviser present.

For Careers Leaders in Colleges, writing their Higher Education destinations reports next summer will be much more of a headache than previous years.

 

LinkedIn career advice

In November 2017 LinkedIn began rolling out a new feature across its site called “Career Advice.” After trials for users in Australia and San Francisco, it then launched for users in the UK, India and the US and, recently popped up on my app.

LinkedIn hopes the feature will

connect members across the LinkedIn network with one another for lightweight mentorship opportunities. Whether you need advice on your career path, switching to a new industry or best practices for a project you’re working on, Career Advice can help you find and connect with the right person who can help.

which sounds like a marvelous opportunity to build networks and gain industry insights in a professional forum.

Upon log on users are presented with an option page introducing them to the feature and asking how it could benefit them

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Users can stipulate which other users in their networks they can get mentoring or advice from

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And specify to those users what help you are particularly looking for

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Back in 2014 I posted about an online community careers support effort on Reddit but those users are anonymous (an important feature for Reddit users) so feedback, engagement and advice to posted questions can vary hugely. The LinkedIn effort is different for the advantages of professionalism and positive branding offered to those offering to be a mentor. For the mentee or those asking for advice, the service is useful for the accessibility to distinct professional insight and then being able to contextualize this with knowledge of the advice givers experience and background

For those Careers Advice colleagues working with clients of an age or professional background that have LinkedIn or those helping clients set up their LinkedIn pages, it could be a useful suggestion to enable this option on their profile. A guide on how to do this to become either a mentor or a mentee is here:

https://www.linkedin.com/help/linkedin/answer/87884/signing-up-for-career-advice?lang=en

Also, if you’re on LinkedIn and you would like to connect, this is me

 

Your @icouldstories top of the charts

 

icould_logo

Since their launch in 2009, icould.com have consistently uploaded videos that most Careers practitioners will have reached for to use as a resource. Their short taking head films are excellent group work resources or quick starter prompts when presenting to a class. The Buzz quiz will also be a saved bookmark for many practitioners when working face to face to clients.

At the time of writing (May 2018) they have uploaded 2800 videos to their Youtube platform and linked pages (pages which are now stacked with useful LMI information powered by the LMI for All platform) so I thought it would be interesting to look at the careers featured in their most popular uploads

Health warning: With some of their videos now dating back almost 10 years, you should check them before using them in front of a class. Some of the interviewees references to past qualifications or websites will sound very outdated to young ears so do check.

So, by number of video views, the most popular icould videos are:

10.Music Producer – 31,000 views

Popular with lots of young folk and now much more accessible with the (relative) affordability of producing programs, it’s obvious why this video has racked up so many views.

 

9. Personal Assistant – 31,000 views

A surprise for me this, perhaps the ubiquitous nature of the role means lots of potential Assistants are interested in what is involved in the role.

 

8. Marketing Manager – 32,000 views

Also another surprise to me as it’s a job title that doesn’t catch as many headlines as others but their seems to be significant interest.

 

7. Human Resource Manager – 34,000 views

Similarly, perhaps HR Managers are roles that people see advertised and look for clarity on what is involved with the role so find a video such as this.

 

6. Games Developer – 37,000 views

Okay, that’s much more in line with my stereotypes of your typical Youtube user

 

5. Prison Officer – 48,000 views

Another interesting entry, in my experience people are drawn to the public service aspect of being a prison officer and the security (ahem) that comes with the role.

 

4. Business Development Manager – 49,000 views

Another fascinating entry as it’s a role with significant potential for challenge and progression yet not one widely known.

It also does have the best comment to geek out the narrative career theory nerds

icould youtube comment

3. Captain – 56,000 views

A Captain of what? The Starship Enterprise?

No, a cruise ship.

2. Speech & Language Therapist – 76,000 views

Lovely to see such a therapeutic and giving role with this many views but also a role with significant science requirements. The comments below the video are also extremely positive about Helen’s (the interviewee) demeanor and story so it seems that it is not just the job title of an icould video that draws viewers but also the inspirational value.

 

And top of the charts!

1. Entrepreneur – Sir Richard Branson – 97,000 views

Helped with a little sprinkling of star name attachment, the role of Entrepreneur is still something that entices the dreamers and aspirationally minded looking for career advice.

 

At the other end of the scale, there are also many professions whose videos have not caught the imagine of the Youtube community. Spread a bit of love to Phil, the Centre Director who’s video has accumulated 6 views.

leave the scary stare out of the thumbnail Phil.