career choice

The media and career choice

I would imagine that most Careers professionals working with young people have seen the impact that media has on their perceptions of work and jobs. From the surge of interest in forensics that spiked in the late 2000s as shows such as CSI and Criminal Minds hit the height of their popularity and resulted in a swell of applicants to Criminology degrees in the UK and the United States to the sudden boom in applications to the US Navy that followed Top Gun in the 1980s, it seems that popular media does have an influence on the career choice of individuals.

These anecdotal examples are also supported by research. In 2017 Konon & Kritikos showed that positive media representations of entrepreneurs resulted increase the probability of self-employment and decrease the probability of salaried work. While this paper from Hoag, Grant & Carpenter (2017) concluded that individuals who consume and have exposure to a wide range of news media were more likely to choose journalism as their major. A 2014 article in the Popular Culture Studies Journal (Tucciarone) conducted a research project looking at representations of the advertising industry and found that even negative or exaggerated portrayals of an industry can have an enticing effect on viewers

One research participant explained: “I think any type of portrayal, even if exaggerated a bit, is better than being completely blind about what goes on in an advertising agency. By watching various depictions of the industry and the careers, I am able to decide if I would even want to take ad courses and be involved with such an industry.”

We also have recent survey data that may point to the impact media consumption can have on young people’s career choices. The 2018 DfE Omnibus survey of pupils and their parents/carers might give some hints as it includes responses on what sources of information young rated as offering helpful careers IAG

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“Any other source” is a term there that I am sure is a catch-all for a wide range of sources but I would suspect that “the media” (in all it’s guises for young people so including streaming services) is present. I’ve previously posted on the use of vloggers to attempt to capture a young audience and introduce them to a broader range of careers but more traditional narrative media, just streamed by young people on demand, may still play a large part. The BBC itself has found that young people watch more Netflix in a week than all of the BBC TV services. Just how binge worthy shows such as Chef’s Table or Better Call Saul are influencing young people’s views on hospitality or law careers remains to be seen, while free to air channels can still find success with formats that see celebrities trying out different job roles.

 

Again, the positive/negative view of the role or even the realism of the portrayal (I suspect few of the other midwives on Ms Willis’ ward will also be finding the time to design a range of home ware) may not matter. As the quoted research participant above notes, all it can take is the job being introduced to the viewer for the spark of interest to ignite.

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Ikigai – “A reason for being”

 

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The termikigaicompounds two Japanese words: iki (wikt:生き) meaning “life; alive” and kai (甲斐) “(an) effect; (a) result; (a) fruit; (a) worth; (a) use; (a) benefit

 

Together these definitions create the concept of “a reason to live” or the idea of having a purpose in life.

 

This is the puzzle of ikigai, and the difficulty of actually figuring out what your distinctive combination may be. It may be that asking these questions produces answers that all fit together and one quickly moves forward, confident in one’s knowledge of his ikigai. But it may not work that way; finding one’s ikigai can be a time-consuming, challenging process.

But that’s why, in the Japanese mind, solving the riddle of one’s ikigai is a process well worth the effort. Together, these four elements can bolster and anchor a well-rounded, satisfying life that provides not just pleasure when one does what one loves, or money when one does what one can be paid for, but a sense that one is fulfilling one’s destiny as well as helping others

The nudge, nudge future of CEIAG

One of the most substantial and thought-provoking pieces of work on Careers published in the last year was the Careers & Enterprise Company (CEC) commissioned report “Moments of Choice” which I looked at here.

The report was written by the Behavioural Insights Team and it gave the CEC plenty of conclusions on which to plan their own future work

We will highlight key messages, alerting schools and colleges to the types of conversations that young people should be having and when they should be having them; the types of information they should consider in those conversations; the mistakes that young people typically make and, perhaps most importantly of all, the things that they do not need to worry about.

on how young people wanted to consume Careers IAG

moments of choice1

and how the CEC would go about trying to achieve that

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In the past weeks two projects have come to light which show the way that this future Careers IAG apparatus might work in practice.

First was another Insights Team piece of research which used a three year randomised controlled trial to find that sending letters of encouragement to high achieving young people in Year 12, “penned” by students from similar backgrounds, increased the number of applications and acceptances to Russell Group universities. This kind of cost-effective intervention (printing and posting some mail merge letters are a lot cheaper than Careers Advisers) can be highly targeted using not only GCSE attainment data but also parental income data now available.

This type of intervention is small-scale when compared to Careers choice help for all young people outlined by the CEC above but we can see how such interventions could be scalable yet still retain an element of personalisation to the message so desired by the young people themselves as well as using technology to more be responsive to users needs.

An example of how this type of personalised messaging system could be used to aid Careers decisions can found in another Behaviour Insights Team project called Promptable.

Aimed at FE students, Promptable uses text messages to text students and nominated “Study Supporters” weekly with reminders and prompt discussions about revision and tutor feedback in the build up to exams. The Team found that students who took part in the Promptable trials boosted their College attendance and exam performance.

Imagine a similar system designed for secondary school age young people and nominated “Supporters” discussing Careers choices at appropriate landmarks. Schools or Colleges ask students to sign up to the site, the school has uploaded their own timeline for PHSE or Careers lessons, for Key Stage 4 choices, for specific visits, talks or careers fairs, for Key Stage 5 choices, for Higher Education plans, links to CEIAG online resources etc etc and then the site sends prompting texts to students and “Supporters” to discuss these milestones or enable Supporters to remind students to attend events. As with Promptable, you could even have the student complete a short questionnaire on sign up outlining areas of interest which they can tailor by sending code texts back (“to out of messages about events please text EVENTS STOP back to this number”) which would also notify the Supporter so a discussion could be had (“actually I think it would be good if you did go to that Apprenticeship Information Evening”).

This kind of interaction fulfills all of the requirements of an easily accessible, horizon broadening intervention method that also encourages personalised face to face discussions. CEIAG event notification and student tracking systems are already on the market through products such as Grofar but this system has the added impetus (or nudge) method of the Supporter, known to the student and offering  chance for discussion. Some in the CEIAG community would ask where in this system does the CEIAG professional fit in? As the local architect of the educational establishment’s profile on the main website, the organiser of the provision, the record keeper of attendance and the option of face to face guidance as another method of provision to be offered to the student body but most of all, as the face of encouraging student sign up to the system would be my proposal.

Large scale systems face a balance between creating systems that work for the majority yet be flexible enough to impact the individual. The communication method of results of systems like Promptable and the targeted use of household data to tailor messages to young people such as the “Encouraging people into University” report could show the way on how this is feasible in CEIAG.

The best Year 9 Options advice video I’ve seen

Isn’t even a video designed to show Year 9 students or their parents in the UK.

 

 

Narrated by Tony Botelho at the Career Services Unit at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia Canada, I think it brilliantly sums up the issues I have with the way a lot of parents and students believe they must frame their decisions when choosing Key Stage 4 options.

No matter how your school organises Key Stage 4 routes, students and parents will always want to make connections between the courses on offer and future employment destinations. They, as Tony says, want to define the “Preferred Career” to give their child a target which, in today’s complicated labour market is understandable. It must be comforting to hear that X leads to Y which will then make you definitely qualified to do Z and even more calming to be able to pass that information onto your son or daughter. Don’t stress, the route is clear.

Deep down though, we know this is a simplified version of the reality facing the majority of young people. We know through our own experiences and those of our peers that happenstance, networks and experience can hold much greater influence over a Career than a route map. At ages 13/14 most learners will have no clear idea of what their “target” is and even those who do, will their perception of their “target” match the reality of that profession (Hello CSI, you and me still need to have words). Many will still be 8 to 10 years of changeable teenage and young adult life away from taking those first, full-time steps into the work of work.

Shouldn’t we be braver when advising those youngsters and their parents by admitting the future ahead may be more complex? Shouldn’t we say it’s OK not to know your “target” or even to stop believing that you must have one? It’s OK to still be discovering, trying new experiences and then taking the time to reflect on those experiences. It’s OK to think about the courses you might take in terms of the experiences and opportunities they might offer whilst studying them rather than what the qualification outcome might lead to.

I think so and it’s a video I will try to use at parents information events in the future.