TES

Primary CEIAG and the preparation for choice

At the beginning of March Damian Hinds reannounced £2m of funding for the CEC to research and invest in CEIAG in Primary schools. This sparked a comment piece by the Headteacher blogger Michael Tidd which argued against this initiative. It’s worth saying that Tidd’s concerns seem to fall into two categories: 1) resources are tight and the funding for this initiative is small so any impact will be slight and 2) Careers Education is not a priority at this stage of education. Leaving aside the zero sum game view on resourcing (just because Primary CEIAG receives some funds, it doesn’t automatically follow that other areas shouldn’t or can’t receive funds), it’s his view on CEIAG that this post will concentrate on.

Tidd asks,

what are we hoping that 10-year-olds will take from these new lessons? I think many primary children have no idea what they want to do when they grow up – and I think that’s okay. Primary education shouldn’t be about preparation for the world of work.

And then goes onto reason that

The world of careers is enormous, and there should be no hurry to make any decisions. It’s bad enough that we force young people to deliberately narrow their curriculum at 14; I certainly don’t want children to be ruling anything in or out any sooner

I understand that any media articles have tight word counts so complexity and subtlety can be lost but I’ll take Tidd at his word and offer the following in rebuttal. The first point is the fact that Primary schools report that they are already offering CEIAG provision to pupils

primary ceiag

through a range of activities. So this funding is not for squeezing new things into crammed timetables but for improving the efficacy of provision that is already happening.

Second, is the need to tackle this conceptual view of Primary (or any) CEIAG as only a mechanism of immediate choice as this is a damaging and false starting point of the aims and outcomes of good CEIAG provision. That isn’t to say that some CEIAG provision does enable and facilitate choices but that other provision lays the groundwork for this. This has long been advocated by the Education & Employers Taskforce charity who established their Inspiring the Future offshoot, Primary Futures to achieve just this

Here the framing of the provision is not choice limiting or insistent on choices being made but as provision as a method for expanding and broadening horizons. The CEC publication, “What works: Careers related learning in primary schools” draws together much of the nascent research in this field to evidence why this is the correct approach.

The evidence suggests that career related learning in primary schools has the potential to help broaden children’s horizons and aspirations, especially (though not exclusively) those most disadvantaged.

Some of the challenges that all CEIAG provision aims to overcome is laid out

Robust longitudinal studies have shown that having narrow occupational expectations and aspirations can, and do, go on to influence the academic effort children exert in certain lessons, the subjects they choose to study, and the jobs they end up pursuing.Research has also shown that the jobs children aspire to may be ones that their parents do, their parents’ friends do or that they see on the TV and/or social media.

The passages (page 2) which describe how young children base their career knowledge and aspirations on their close circle of influencers (social capital), conceive their view on their place and opportunities in society (cultural capital) and establish their belief in their ability to determine their own outcomes against other factors (identity capital) lucidly offer the rationale for careers provision at Primary school age. The argument that Primary CEIAG is not beneficial because young minds would subsequently preclude routes falls away as the very rationale for informed Primary CEIAG provision is for young minds to expand routes and options.

How these aims can be achieved is explained in detail in a recent LKMCO/Founders4Schools report “More than a job’s worth: Making careers education age-appropriate.” In its sections covering the rationale and design of CEIAG provision at secondary and Post-16 level, the report retreads much ground already covered through the CEC’s What Works series and the original Gatsby report. Where the report adds value to the ever-increasing library of CEIAG publications though is the clear direction for practitioners as to what sorts of provision could be offered to children of different ages.

lmkco report1

The inclusion of the 2-4 Pre-school age group caused enough of a stir to get media coverage which also tended towards Tidd’s take on the concepts being discussed.

Finally, it’s worth saying that I agree with concern around the narrowing of options (read; curriculum) at 14 as the benefits of continuing with more a broader curriculum for longer is well evidenced. Where I would disagree with Tidd is that I would propose that the methods and age appropriate delivery of CEIAG provision the LKMCO publication outlines might actually prove to have benefits for students once they reach the later stages of secondary schooling. At these Moments of Choice (to use the CEC terminology), when students currently struggle through a complex choice system without the skills and knowledge to navigate that choice architecture, the pay off from the horizon broadening and stereotype challenging Primary CEIAG work he disparages could be evident.

“Going in the right direction?” Ofsted Careers survey & Bis response documents

A quick round up of all of the documents released today:

The actual Ofsted survey report “Going in the right direction?”

Click to access Going%20in%20the%20right%20direction.pdf

The accompanying press release:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/news/careers-guidance-schools-not-working-well-enough?news=21607

In response the Government/Bis immediately published this press release:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-calls-for-culture-change-in-careers-guidance

And this, more detailed, Careers Guidance Action Plan:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/238791/Careers_Guidance_Action_Plan.pdf

And, later in the day, this Inspiration Vision Statement. No, I’ve no idea what one of those is either:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/238841/bis-13-1176-inspiration-vision-statement-R2.pdf

Statements from Professionals and Organisations:

Association of Colleges, both damming and constructive:

http://www.aoc.co.uk/en/newsroom/aoc_news_releases.cfm/id/D6A21B50-A614-4BD8-A216757B64DEA8FD/page/1

Association of School & College Leaders, lead by Brian Lightman who has always been a great advocate for CEIAG

http://www.ascl.org.uk/News_views/press_releases/government_must_take_urgent_action_address_careers_guidance_issues

The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development takes the opportunity to flag up it’s Learning to Work Programme:

http://www.cipd.co.uk/pm/peoplemanagement/b/weblog/archive/2013/09/10/careers-advice-in-schools-not-working-says-ofsted.aspx

The blogger Patrick Montrose provides a summary:

http://montrose42.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/careers-guidance-in-schools-not-working-well-enough-according-to-ofsted/

David Hughes of NIACE takes a thoughtful and holistic approach:

http://www.niace.org.uk/news/let-s-help-school-improve-careers-advice-says-niace?src=fp1st

Dr Deirdre Hughes OBE links the report to recent and future work of the National Careers Council:

http://deirdrehughes.org/2013/09/a-new-careers-action-plan-for-england/

A short response from the CBI who have long championed the strengthening of the relationship between education and employers :

http://www.cbi.org.uk/media-centre/press-releases/2013/09/cbi-responds-to-ofsted-report-on-career-guidance/

The 157 Group of Colleges are severe in their verdict:

http://www.157group.co.uk/news/news/157-group-responds-to-ofsteds-report-on-careers-guidance-in-schools

The Association of Employment and Training Providers release a statement highlighting how they can aid schools:

http://www.aelp.org.uk/news/pressReleases/details/more-employers-and-providers-should-gain-access-to/

The National Foundation for Educational Research echos calls for a culture change with a press release and a paper:

http://www.nfer.ac.uk/about-nfer/media-and-events/nfer-calls-for-action-as-evidence-reinforces-findings-of-ofsted-report-on-careers-guidance.cfm

http://www.nfer.ac.uk/nfer/publications/99938/99938.pdf

The Career Development Institute take the opportunity to repeat their call for the any new guidance to require Level 6 qualified advisers:

http://www.thecdi.net/News-Reports/cdi-response-to-ofsted-thematic-review

Media reaction

From FE Week:

http://feweek.co.uk/2013/09/10/ofsted-boss-sir-michael-hits-out-at-schools-over-careers-guidance/

The BBC take:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-24015879

The Guardian reports:

http://careers.theguardian.com/careers-blog/career-advice-schools-failing-pupils-ofsted?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Stephen Twigg has his say in the TES (includes the phrase “jobs of tomorrow” for the full careers bingo):

http://news.tes.co.uk/opinion_blog/b/weblog/archive/2013/09/10/stephen-twigg-failure-of-careers-guidance-goes-to-the-heart-of-the-government-39-s-complacency-and-economic-incompetence.aspx

This Guardian article by Jan Murray was published on the 26th August but is an excellent and prescient piece:

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2013/aug/26/school-careers-advice-legislation

I will update this page as more are published.

Much to think about and contemplate over the forthcoming months regarding Careers work in schools.